Sun Voyager - Iceland - Home - Dee Potter Photography

DEE POTTER DEE POTTER

Having a little free time on my last full day in Iceland, the sun was out after an afternoon rain, and the colourful clouds called to a few of us who'd just had the most incredible photography journey across the country together to venture down to the waterfront to shoot this attraction in the amazing light. Reykjavik’s famous seaside sculpture is called "Solfar" or "Sun Voyager". Created by Icelandic sculptor, Jon Gunnar Arnason, Solfar was the winning entry in a 1986 competition to commemorate Reykjavik's 200th anniversary, and unveiled at full size in on August 18, 1990. Although it's often referred to as a Viking ship heading toward Mt. Esja across the bay, it's rather the artist's ode to the sun, symbolizing light and hope. The stainless steel structure stands 9 m high × 7 m wide × 18 m long (29.5 ft × 22.9 ft × 59 ft), so, no matter what your interpretation of this now-iconic Reykjavik tourist must-see, it's absolutely magnificent to experience up close, in person. GPS: 64.14761 N, -21.922288 W
Icelandic,br,Landscape,photography,Ocean,Sea,,,,Sun,Voyager,Seascape
Sun Voyager - Iceland - Home - Dee Potter Photography
Having a little free time on my last full day in Iceland, the sun was out after an afternoon rain, and the colourful clouds called to a few of us who'd just had the most incredible photography journey across the country together to venture down to the waterfront to shoot this attraction in the amazing light. Reykjavik’s famous seaside sculpture is called "Solfar" or "Sun Voyager". Created by Icelandic sculptor, Jon Gunnar Arnason, Solfar was the winning entry in a 1986 competition to commemorate Reykjavik's 200th anniversary, and unveiled at full size in on August 18, 1990. Although it's often referred to as a Viking ship heading toward Mt. Esja across the bay, it's rather the artist's ode to the sun, symbolizing light and hope. The stainless steel structure stands 9 m high × 7 m wide × 18 m long (29.5 ft × 22.9 ft × 59 ft), so, no matter what your interpretation of this now-iconic Reykjavik tourist must-see, it's absolutely magnificent to experience up close, in person. GPS: 64.14761 N, -21.922288 W